Warhol exhibit at High Museum extended until Sept. 10

11:52 a.m. Monday, Aug. 28, 2017 Arts & Culture
“Muhammad Ali,” from 1978, is part of an exhibit of 250 works by pop artist Andy Warhol on display at the High Museum of Art. Photo: courtesy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The High Museum of Art announced Monday it will extend its sweeping exhibit of artwork by pop artist Andy Warhol for an additional week, through Sept. 10.

Some 250 works and ephemera by the prolific printmaker have been on display since June 3 at the museum, which is the exclusive East Coast venue for the exhibit, entitled, “Andy Warhol: Prints from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation,”

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Marilyn Monroe,” from 1967, is among the screenprints by artist Andy Warhol currently on display at the High Museum of Art. The museum has extended the Warhol exhibit for an additional week, until Sept. 10. Photo: courtesy, Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

“We hope that anyone who hasn’t yet had the chance to see the exhibition pays us a visit before it leaves Atlanta,” said director Rand Suffolk.

The show includes screenprint portfolios as “Marilyn Monroe” (1967), “Campbell’s Soup I” (1968), “Electric Chair” (1971) and “Mao” (1972). The show at the High opened with a “Factory Party,” celebrating Warhol’s famous studio.

A look at the 'Infinity Mirrors' exhibit ahead of it coming to the High Museum

Warhol produced his first portfolio of screenprints, “Marilyn Monroe,” in 1967 at his Factory studio, and he continued making screenprints through the end of his life, in 1987.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Jane Fonda,” from 1982, is part of a sweeping exhibit of works by Andy Warhol on display at the High Museum of Art. Photo: courtesy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The works in the exhibition are drawn exclusively from the collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation in Portland, Ore.

Warhol’s prints, writes the High, “speak to American values of the prosperous post-war consumer culture and foreshadow society’s preoccupation with celebrity, fashion, politics, sensationalism and scandal.

View full experience