These are the best places to see the incredibly rare Great American Eclipse coming next month

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These are the best places to see the incredibly rare Great American Eclipse coming next month

It’s the final countdown: We are officially one month away from the first total solar eclipse to cross the country coast to coast in nearly 100 years.

The summer eclipse will be incredibly accessible to anyone within a 200-mile drive of its path of totality, but the most important factor in getting a good view is weather.

If you’re hoping to make a trip out of the big event, Greatamericaneclipse.com has a list of 10 great places to see the phenomenon based on the best weather odds for clear skies:

Madras, OregonTotality begins at 10:19 a.m. PDT and lasts 2 minutes and 4 seconds.

Snake River Valley, IdahoTotality begins at 11:33 a.m. MDT and lasts 2 minutes and 18 seconds.

Casper, WyomingTotality begins at 11:42 a.m. MDT and lasts 2 minutes and 4 seconds.

Sandhills of western NebraskaTotality begins at 11:49 a.m. MDT and lasts 2 minutes and 30 seconds.

St. Joseph, MissouriTotality begins at 1:06 p.m. CDT and lasts 2 minutes and 39 seconds.

Carbondale, IllinoisTotality begins at 1:20 p.m. CDT and lasts 2 minutes and 41.6 seconds.

Hopkinsville, KentuckyTotality begins at 1:24 p.m. CDT and lasts 2 minutes and 41.2 seconds.

Nashville, TennesseeTotality begins at 1:27 p.m. CDT and lasts 1 minute and 57 seconds.

Great Smoky Mountains National ParkTotality begins at 2:35 p.m. EST and lasts 1 minute and 17 seconds.

Columbia, South CarolinaTotality begins at 2:43 p.m. EST and lasts 2 minutes and 30 seconds.

Plan on traveling within or from Georgia? Head to Rabun County, about two hours north of metro Atlanta, where the eclipse will begin at 2:35 p.m. and last 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

The area is also holding an array of events to commemorate the phenomenon.

Other accessible road trips from Georgia include the Great Smoky Mountains; Columbia, South Carolina and Nashville, Tennessee.

If you want to know how far you’ll have to travel from wherever you are to catch the total solar eclipse, this Google simulator will show you.

Just type in your zip code or city and the simulator will tell you how much of the sun will be blocked by the moon, how the sun will travel across the sky over a 3-hour period on Aug. 21 and what time to watch.

If you do plan on seeing the spectacle in person, Space.com has some helpful safety tips:

Space.com
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